Reblogged from wretchedoftheearth

wretchedoftheearth:

like no sorry I don’t know a single cis man who lives in fear that female strangers are going to stalk him

or feel entitled to touch his body in public

or follow him home

or catcall him

or take his headphones out on the bus or train to hit on him

or ask for his number

or get him into a position where he has to give up his number for fear of violence

I just don’t

and even if I did, it’d be so fucking uncommon and just unwarranted

because women are not in the habit of doing that.

(via dynastylnoire)

Reblogged from navigatethestream
Reblogged from heytoyourmamanem
Reblogged from yoursocialconstructsareshowing
Regular users of pornography are less likely to convict for a rape, and less likely to give a harsh sentence to a rapist if in fact convicted. Conversely, individuals who do not use pornography are more likely to convict an accused rapist. Garcia, L.T. (1986). Exposures to pornography and attitude about women and rape: A correlative study. AG 22 (1853) 382-383.
Zillman & Bryant, (1984). Effects of massive exposure to pornography. In N.M. Malamuth, & E. Donnerstein (Eds), Pornography and Sexual Aggression (pp. 115-142). Orlando, FL: Academic Press. (via yoursocialconstructsareshowing)

(via dynastylnoire)

Reblogged from drosenthalart
drosenthalart:

The baby was finally born! He’s so beautiful…next I will have to paint mother and son. =]

drosenthalart:

The baby was finally born! He’s so beautiful…next I will have to paint mother and son. =]

(via dynastylnoire)

Reblogged from remotely-viewing-khemet
Reblogged from dynamicafrica
dynamicafrica:

Great Concern As Parents of Missing #Chibok Schoolgirls Tragically Pass Away.
This headline is so shocking and heartbreaking it’s almost unbelievable. 11 parents of the missing Chibok schoolgirls have died or have been killed in the three months since their abduction.
According to a report by AP, seven of the girls’ fathers were among over 50 bodies that were brought to a hospital in the area after an attack on the nearby village of Kautakari this month. Four more parents are said to have died from heart failure, high blood pressure and other illnesses many blame on the trauma sustained from this incident.
Speaking out on this issue, community leader Pogo Bitrus has said, “one father of two of the girls kidnapped just went into a kind of coma and kept repeating the names of his daughters, until life left him.”
Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan, who has been heavily criticized for his slow response and the ineffective manner in which he has been handling both this situation and the greater Boko Haram threat, met with some of the victim’s parents and their classmates on Tuesday where he promised to continue efforts to bring back the girls alive.
Meanwhile, the town of Chibok seems to be in more and more danger as Boko Haram continue to gain ground in the surrounding area. Over the weekend, the terrorist group launched several raids in northeastern Nigerian towns and villages where they also attacked an army base in the strategic town of Damboa. This particular attack saw as many as 15, 000 civilians fleeing the area as a result.
Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | Pinterest | Soundcloud | Mixcloud

dynamicafrica:

Great Concern As Parents of Missing #Chibok Schoolgirls Tragically Pass Away.

This headline is so shocking and heartbreaking it’s almost unbelievable. 11 parents of the missing Chibok schoolgirls have died or have been killed in the three months since their abduction.

According to a report by AP, seven of the girls’ fathers were among over 50 bodies that were brought to a hospital in the area after an attack on the nearby village of Kautakari this month. Four more parents are said to have died from heart failure, high blood pressure and other illnesses many blame on the trauma sustained from this incident.

Speaking out on this issue, community leader Pogo Bitrus has said, “one father of two of the girls kidnapped just went into a kind of coma and kept repeating the names of his daughters, until life left him.”

Nigerian President Goodluck Jonathan, who has been heavily criticized for his slow response and the ineffective manner in which he has been handling both this situation and the greater Boko Haram threat, met with some of the victim’s parents and their classmates on Tuesday where he promised to continue efforts to bring back the girls alive.

Meanwhile, the town of Chibok seems to be in more and more danger as Boko Haram continue to gain ground in the surrounding area. Over the weekend, the terrorist group launched several raids in northeastern Nigerian towns and villages where they also attacked an army base in the strategic town of Damboa. This particular attack saw as many as 15, 000 civilians fleeing the area as a result.

Twitter | Facebook | Instagram | PinterestSoundcloud | Mixcloud

(via dynastylnoire)

Reblogged from wretchedoftheearth
[TW: rape]
We do know something about most men who rape. For example, numerous studies have found that while they tend to be more emotionally constricted than nonaggressive men, and are often angry and hostile to women, most of them are psychologically “normal.” The psychologist David Lisak points out that the old stereotype of the rapist was derived in part from extensive studies with incarcerated rapists, many of whom committed acts of grievous violence against their victims, who were often strangers. But according to Lisak, research over the past twenty years clearly demonstrates that the vast majority of rapes are perpetrated by what he calls “undetected rapists,” and they usually know their victims. Undetected rapists are men who typically behave in stereotypically masculine ways, see sex as conquest, and are hypersensitive to any perceived slight against their manhood. But they are not crazy, and they are not sociopaths. “There is simply no evidence, save the rape itself,” Katharine Baker writes in the Harvard Law Review, “suggesting that all or even most rapists are objectively depraved.” Chillingly, she goes on to say that given the social norms that encourage it, there is evidence that rape is “culturally dictated, not culturally deviant.”
Jackson Katz, Macho Paradox: Why Some Men Hurt Women and How All Men Can Help

(Source: wretchedoftheearth, via dynastylnoire)

Reblogged from sonofbaldwin
Please stop calling this a nation of immigrants. We are not a nation of immigrants. We are a nation of colonizers, ex-slaves, ghosts of genocide victims, and preferred immigrants. Maurice Lucas Goes IN

(Source: sonofbaldwin, via dynastylnoire)

Reblogged from rebelbaes
Reblogged from yellowxperil

sapphrikah:

yellowxperil:

yellowxperil:

mothkult:

yellowxperil:

mothkult:

yellowxperil:

i need to stop seeing this shit come up on my dashboard. stop mimicking “black men” when you invoke predatory sexuality. recognize it and stop doing it. recognize the part youre playing in perpetuating the deadly myth of the black male rapist.

and read this: "Rape, Racism and the Myth of the Black Rapist" from Angela Davis’s Women Race and Class

I understand what is said here, and agree. But I think the pictures/gifs used to demonstrate were a bad choice, only one directly points to the “Predator” being a black man. Just an observation.

find out what aave is and come back

Point made, I was just giving an observation. I agree with your post 100% , but I think there are better examples

absolutely there are. but i made this post as a direct response to seeing the first two gifsets go viral around tumblr’s feminist community. i added the third screenshot to further contextualize my point. a lot of feminists i followm reblogged the hell out of the first two, obviously not seeing that they were using racism to fight sexism.

i also still think you’re failing to see that these are GOOD examples. because in neo-liberal media, overt racism isn’t as pervasive as “subtle” racism. so it’s exactly those first two posts that ppl need to be more aware of. because they might not be trained to see the racism in those situations where it’s not blatant. and that’s exactly what happened when those posts went viral.

this post is going around again a little bit so i want to add a thought process i’ve developed since this post’s conception. if you don’t actually think this is a thing (like some of you reblogging this to say black ppl are reaching bc you assumed op, i, was black) keep a notepad with you for a few weeks and write down every time a non-black person slips into aave (in speech, in a text message, on facebook, whatever.) then next to that, write down why. i’ve done this, and the second column never strayed from three overlapping categories:

1) jocose sexual predation (as in the examples above. real life examples: “AY GIRL, lemme holla atcha!” “lemme get cho numba.. ay yo where you goin’?” on someone’s selfie/profile pic: “DAYUM.” “damn ma, you is fiiiiine.”) verbally, this is, without fail, accompanied by a faked very deep voice. wonder why?

2) jocose aggression (real life examples: “YO FUCK DAT NOISE I AIN’T ABOUT DAT, FUCK DA HATERZ” “WHO IS YOU” “YO ima STOMP that FOOL!” "im finna snatch this bitch weave")

3) being loud (real life examples: “MUH FUCKIN HOMIE” “FO REAL DO” “ooo girrrlll!!!” )

so we slip into aave when we’re putting on sexual predation, aggression, and loudness. what does that tell us about stereotypes of black americans?

your solidarity is so real I wanna weep.

(via dynastylnoire)

Reblogged from walterspizza
walterspizza:

i made a thing so i can send it to people who keep insisting israel is not committing genocide against palestine 
with that it is bedtime i am too depressed for this shitty ass world

walterspizza:

i made a thing so i can send it to people who keep insisting israel is not committing genocide against palestine 

with that it is bedtime i am too depressed for this shitty ass world

(via dynastylnoire)

Reblogged from medievalpoc
medievalpoc:

Luca Giordano
Four Female Musicians
Italy (c. 1658)
Oil on Canvas, 57 x 101.5 cm.
Rijksmuseum

medievalpoc:

Luca Giordano

Four Female Musicians

Italy (c. 1658)

Oil on Canvas, 57 x 101.5 cm.

Rijksmuseum

(via dynastylnoire)

Reblogged from medievalpoc
I did’t find these prints by reading Art Historical literature, they were barely studied and hardly written about. I found them because I ran through whole collections looking for artworks with depictions of black people. People have choices in the things they see, and therefore the history of art will always be rewritten.

Esther Schruder, Art Historian, on researching works for the Black Is Beautiful:Rubens to Dumas exhibition

It’s very telling to me that a majority of the art I’ve posted here has been the same method-searching through piles and piles of barely-cataloged stuff until I find something to share.

(via medievalpoc)

(via dynastylnoire)

Reblogged from wesleywalesandersons

The basics are that for every one female-speaking character in family-rated films (G, PG and PG-13), there are roughly three male characters; that crowd and group scenes in these films — live-action and animated — contain only 17 percent female characters; and that the ratio of male-female characters has been exactly the same since 1946. Throw in the hypersexualization of many of the female characters that are there, even in G-rated movies, and their lack of occupations and aspirations and you get the picture.

It wasn’t the lack of female lead characters that first struck me about family films. We all know that’s been the case for ages, and we love when movies like The Hunger Games: Catching Fire and Frozen hit it big. It was the dearth of female characters in the worlds of the stories — the fact that the fictitious villages and jungles and kingdoms and interplanetary civilizations were nearly bereft of female population — that hit me over the head. This being the case, we are in effect enculturating kids from the very beginning to see women and girls as not taking up half of the space. Couldn’t it be that the percentage of women in leadership positions in many areas of society — Congress, law partners, Fortune 500 board members, military officers, tenured professors and many more — stall out at around 17 percent because that’s the ratio we’ve come to see as the norm?

OK, now for the fun part: It’s easy, fast and fun to add female characters, in two simple steps. And I want to be clear I’m not talking about creating more movies with a female lead. If you do, God bless and thank you. Please consider me for that role.

Step 1: Go through the projects you’re already working on and change a bunch of the characters’ first names to women’s names. With one stroke you’ve created some colorful unstereotypical female characters that might turn out to be even more interesting now that they’ve had a gender switch. What if the plumber or pilot or construction foreman is a woman? What if the taxi driver or the scheming politician is a woman? What if both police officers that arrive on the scene are women — and it’s not a big deal?

Step 2: When describing a crowd scene, write in the script, “A crowd gathers, which is half female.” That may seem weird, but I promise you, somehow or other on the set that day the crowd will turn out to be 17 percent female otherwise. Maybe first ADs think women don’t gather, I don’t know.

And there you have it. You have just quickly and easily boosted the female presence in your project without changing a line of dialogue.

Yes, we can and will work to tell more women’s stories, listen to more women’s voices and write richer female characters and to fix the 5-to-1 ratio of men/women behind the camera. But consider this: In all of the sectors of society that still have a huge gender disparity, how long will it take to correct that? You can’t snap your fingers and suddenly half of Congress is women. But there’s one category where the underrepresentation of women can be fixed tomorrow: onscreen. In the time it takes to make a movie or create a television show, we can change what the future looks like.

There are woefully few women CEOs in the world, but there can be lots of them in films. We haven’t had a woman president yet, but we have on TV. (Full disclosure: One of them was me.) How can we fix the problem of corporate boards being so unequal without quotas? Well, they can be half women instantly, onscreen. How do we encourage a lot more girls to pursue science, technology and engineering careers? By casting droves of women in STEM jobs today in movies and on TV. Hey, it would take me many years to become a real nuclear physicist, but I can play one tomorrow.

Here’s what I always say: If they can see it, they can be it.

Geena Davis on gender equality in film and television [x] (via wesleywalesandersons)

(via dynastylnoire)